Mid-City

Mid City House

The Mid-City neighborhood is located at the center of New Orleans, midway between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain. Though the neighborhood includes only the area between the Pontchartrain Expressway, City Park Avenue, Orleans Avenue, and Broad Street, many people use the term “Mid-City” to describe a much larger district of central New Orleans. Once referred to as the “back of town,” Mid-City is a thriving and diverse community combining residential areas, parks, restaurants, shops, office buildings and light industrial complexes.

Mid-City has one of New Orleans’ largest intact historic districts included on the National Register of Historic Places. The majority of historic buildings found in Mid-City today were built in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Mid-City neighborhood remained rural and swampy until new pumping stations on Broad and Bienville improved the quality of the land. This opened the area to new construction. By the early twentieth century, Mid-City was a growing neighborhood comprised mostly of single and double shotgun houses from the 1890s and bungalows built in the early twentieth century.

Mid-City was one of the first suburban-style neighborhoods in New Orleans. A streetcar line that ran the entirety of Canal Street made Mid-City easily accessible to the Central Business District. Though the streetcar was replaced by buses in 1964, it has since been rebuilt. The new Canal Street Line links downtown neighborhoods like the French Quarter and CBD to Mid-City and nearby attractions.

Other attractions in Mid-City include a number of cemeteries such as the Odd Fellow’s Rest and Masonic Cemetery, Mid-City Rock n’ Bowl and a portion of the scenic waterway Bayou St. John. It is also in close proximity to Xavier and Delgado Universities and City Park, New Orleans’ largest green space. The neighborhood was also the birthplace of one of New Orleans most famous citizens, jazz musician Louis Armstrong.

Today, the Mid-City neighborhood is still recovering from the effects of Hurricane Katrina. After the levees broke, homes in the area flooded from a depth of mere inches to 8 feet. Due in part to the efforts of community action groups like the Mid-City Neighborhood Organization (MCNO), Mid-City is one of the fastest-recovering neighborhoods in the city. Since the storm, more than 50% of residents and businesses have returned to the area.

Please use the interactive Google Map below to view the boundaries of Mid-City or see if your home is in our target neighborhood.


Architecture Types:

You can usually find the following architectural styles in this neighborhood.


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